Videos

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Resilience, Flexibility and Liveability of Urban Space
Published on 19 Jun 2017

Filmed June 7, 2017, at the ULI Asia Pacific Summit in Singapore.

Enhancing the liveability of cities on the basis of the existing urban environment is a huge challenge on its own. The changing world demands improving the resilience of existing assets and buildings as well as cities as a whole, repurposing of assets, and responding to the changing user patterns of urban space.
Speakers:
* Prof. Greg Clark of Urban Land Institute
* William Lee of Microsoft
* Tony Lombardo of Lendlease
* Marilyn Taylor of the University of Pennsylvania School of Design
* Forth Bagley of KPF

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

Right of Way: Securing Kenya's Railway Corridor and Improving Livelihoods

“I am now living well, and even heavy rains don’t affect us anymore. I now have a good flush toilet and a shower.” These are the words of Beatrice Naliaka from Kenya, a beneficiary of the East African Trade and Transport Facilitation Project (EATTFP). In its effort to secure the railway corridor along the city of Nairobi, the Government of Kenya has also provided better housing for residents of low-income neighborhoods who had encroached the corridor. Over 30,000 families are expected to benefit from better living conditions.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Smart cities MOOC

Smart Cities is a Massive Open Online Course that offers an introduction to the principles of management of smart urban infrastructure systems. It addresses the main challenges in management of Smart Cities during the transition and operation phases in the life-cycle of a Smart City. The course is structured into 5 blocks. In the first three blocks, general principles of management of Smart Urban infrastructures are covered. The last two blocks of the course focus on the management of Smart Urban Energy and Smart Urban Transportation systems as concrete cases.

Source: iglus.org

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Solid Waste Management by Lucy Kamau | #MjiWetu
Published on 14 Feb 2017

Mji Wetu is an initiative seeking to have you, as a Kenyan be a part of the solution to the issues that are currently face our societies. With our topics being around infrastructure, public health, security, urbanization and lifestyle. We would like you to participate by sharing your experiences and solutions to these issues. 
Last week's discussion on #mjiwetu was on public health, with the key driver being the importance of health and sanitation in and around our cities.

Lucy Kamau, took the time to create and share this video on solid waste management and possible solutions that our leaders and us, as citizens can take to address the issues.

You too, can be a contributor. Join the conversation #mjiwetu and let's do it for our cities.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Solution for rapid urbanization

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Somik Lall, World Bank - Africa’s Cities, Opening Doors to the World
Published on 20 Jun 2017

Cities in Sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing rapid population growth. Yet their economic growth has not kept pace. Why? One factor might be low capital investment, due in part to Africa’s relative poverty: Other regions have reached similar stages of urbanization at higher per capita GDP. In this lecture Somik Lall from the World Bank discusses a deeper reason: African cities are closed to the world. Compared with other developing cities, cities in Africa produce few goods and services for trade on regional and international markets. To grow economically as they are growing in size, Africa’s cities must open their doors to the world. They need to specialize in manufacturing, along with other regionally and globally tradable goods and services. And to attract global investment in tradables production, cities must develop scale economies, which are associated with successful urban economic development in other regions.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

Strengthening rural livelihoods in the face of rapid urbanisation in Africa
Streamed live on 20 Mar 2017

https://brusselsbriefings.net/
Rural areas in many African countries are undergoing manifest transformation processes fuelled by dynamics such a population growth, urbanisation and increasing mobility. The relationship between rural and urban areas is changing and the rural-urban divide is fading, with increasing flows of people, goods and services between the two and the emergence of new migratory and livelihoods patterns. Next to the growth of capital and major cities, much of the urbanization witnessed in African countries has taken place in the continuum of rural areas with villages, towns and smaller cities below 500,000 inhabitants, fuelled in part by better infrastructure and digital connectivity as well as the search for economic opportunity. Rural towns and smaller cities have the potential to invigorate rural areas in their function as market hubs and basic service provision. Yet fulfilling such functions requires considerable investment and local institutional capacity as well as clear political commitment. Strengthening rural-urban linkages in terms of infrastructure, transport, market access and exchange of information, ideas and innovation can catalyse economic development in rural areas and provide future perspectives for rural population and especially youth. Rural development strategies should therefore consider some of the following opportunities: New income-generating opportunities in food systems as a result of changing urban consumption patterns Investing in towns and intermediary cities as hubs for economic growth and service delivery for rural areas Boosting agricultural productivity and attracting youth to farming Supporting job creation in the rural non-farm economy and enabling diversified and multi-local livelihood strategies

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

The Chamwada Report: Episode 76 Sustainable Urbanization in Africa
The Future of Affordable Housing
Published on 18 Jun 2017

Filmed June 7, 2017, at the Asia Pacific Summit in Singapore.

As the global shortage of affordable housing becomes ever more critical, this session focuses on the drivers and emerging solutions to the issue and the roles cities and the real estate market need to play. Views and experiences are shared by those directly involved in housing, in its funding and delivery, and in its planning, policy, and design.
Speakers:
* Nicholas Brooke of Professional Property Services Group
* Dr. Liu Thai Ker of the Centre for Liveable Cities and RSP Architects Planners & Engineers
* Paige Walker of Mirvac
* Carl Weisbrod of HR&A

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

The future of cities

This is a conversation starter first, a video second. I’d love to hear your thoughts on cities, the future, and this project. 

I shared some words, a reading list and featured interviewees here: medium.com/@oscarboyson/the-future-of-cities-ba4e26c807fe#.lrpyoofi4

* Note that the first shot in the movie a "Garbage Truck in Taipei" is actually in Changhua City, also in Taiwan. Thank you Taiwanese friends for pointing this out! 

Thank you to everybody who contributed! Trust me when I say that even if I didn’t get your footage in the cut, we can feel it in the finished product. I want to keep telling urban stories and building on these ideas - hope you do too. Knowledge is Power.

Source: youtube.com

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

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