Videos

Video Title
Edgar Pieterse: The Politics of Governing African Urban Spaces
Streamed live on 1 Jul 2017

In the wake of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and Habitat III there have been important political and policy developments across the African continent. Just a few years ago scholars lamented the political denial of urbanization in most African countries, which the argument suggested, resulted in the dysfunctional forms of urban development in evidence. At a formal policy level this has shifted, starting with an explicit pro-urban stance at the African Union level, down to a commitment from many African governments to produce National Urban Policies in keeping with the new institutional normative framework promoted by the international development industry. As a result there are now two mainstream discourses—multi-level governance and decentralisation—that anchor debates about how best to restructure governmental relations to accommodate a more proactive and accommodating stance towards urbanization. These shifts call for a more critical and penetrating understanding of the politics that will get marshalled by vested interests, and the potentiality for a transformative urban agenda to find roots in changing institutional architectures. Conceptually this demands that one explore a different avenue than the two dominant approaches to the politics of urban governance. One approach seeks a magical technocratic fix in the form of an optimum institutional design that can foster genuine decentralisation and “political will”, whatever that ill-defined notion might mean. A second approach is obsessed with the continuous discovery of neoliberal governmentality and regards almost all efforts at modernisation of the public sector, formal participatory processes, multi-institution approaches to service delivery as merely evidence of exploitative intent. As the ground of formal politics and policy continue to shift, this lecture will explore the kind of political imaginary and innovations that could be invoked to offer a more grounded, generous and propositional scholarship that can contribute to the reinvention of urban governance.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

America in the Age of Jackson: The Rise of Capitalism and Birth of Urbanization
Published on 5 Jul 2017

The spirit of Jacksonian Democracy animated the party from the early 1830s to the 1850s, shaping the era, with the Whig Party the main opposition. The new Democratic Party became a coalition of farmers, city-dwelling laborers, and Irish Catholics.[25]

The new party was pulled together by Martin Van Buren in 1828 as Andrew Jackson crusaded against the corruption of President John Quincy Adams. The new party (which did not get the name "Democrats" until 1834) swept to a landslide. As Norton et al. explain regarding 1828:

Jacksonians believed the people's will had finally prevailed. Through a lavishly financed coalition of state parties, political leaders, and newspaper editors, a popular movement had elected the president. The Democrats became the nation's first well-organized national party.[26]
The platforms, speeches, and editorials were founded upon a broad consensus among Democrats. As Norton et al. explain:

The Democrats represented a wide range of views but shared a fundamental commitment to the Jeffersonian concept of an agrarian society. They viewed a central government as the enemy of individual liberty and they believed that government intervention in the economy benefited special-interest groups and created corporate monopolies that favored the rich. They sought to restore the independence of the individual--the artisan and the ordinary farmer--by ending federal support of banks and corporations and restricting the use of paper currency.[27]
Jackson vetoed more legislation than all previous presidents combined. The long-term effect was to create the modern strong presidency.[28] Jackson and his supporters also opposed reform as a movement. Reformers eager to turn their programs into legislation called for a more active government. But Democrats tended to oppose programs like educational reform and the establishment of a public education system. They believed, for instance, that public schools restricted individual liberty by interfering with parental responsibility and undermined freedom of religion by replacing church schools.

Jackson supported white supremacy, as did nearly every major politician of the day. He looked at the Indian question in terms of military and legal policy, not as a problem due to their race.[29] Indeed, in 1813 he adopted and treated as his own son a three-year-old Indian orphan—seeing in him a fellow orphan that was "so much like myself I feel an unusual sympathy for him."[30] In legal terms, when it became a matter of state sovereignty versus tribal sovereignty, he went with the states and moved the Indians to fresh lands with no white rivals in what became Oklahoma.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

David Harvey: The Crisis of Planetary Urbanization
Published on 1 Jul 2017

David Harvey: The crisis of planetary urbanization
David Harvey: The crisis of planetary urbanization
In his most recent trip to Brazil, David Harvey talks about the urban protests dubbed "middle class revolts" that have been taking place all over the world, from São Paulo to Istanbul, against the backdrop of what he calls the "crisis of planetary urbanization".

This lecture took place in Curitiba on November 18th 2014, during a series of talks entitled "The Political Economy Of Urbanization", marking the publishing of the second and final volume of his COMPANION TO MARX'S CAPITAL. This trip took him also to the cities of Brasília, Recife, Fortaleza and São Paulo. The lectures also celebrated the publishing of Boitempo's new edition of Volume II of Marx's Capital – the first edition revised and expanded according to the documents of the MEGA2 project. Recently, Boitempo's edition of Volume I of Capital was awarded the Jabuti Prize for translation – the most important prize in the brazilian publishing world. All of professor Harvey's lectures were recorded and are being published here in Boitempo's channel on YouTube. 

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

Global Urban Lectures, Fernando Murillo - A Compass for Cities

In this lecture Fernando Murillo from University of Buenos Aires discusses the “Compass” of cities – a participatory methodology for policy making . It consists of different indicators represented graphically as a “Compass”, combining four fundamental dimensions dealing with the progressive fulfilment of human rights.

SYNOPSIS

Issues which the lecture addresses
This lecture addresses city planning challenges in urban planning practice, in relation to the implementation of the New Urban Agenda:

a) Progressive fulfilment of human rights with focus on informal settlements – shifting from eviction and massive regularisation to city-wide informal settlement upgrading and prevention;

b) Participation – moving away from public participation towards community self organization and engagement;

c) Public works – reacting to social, environmental and economic needs for more proactive and problem preventive approaches focused on infrastructure and

d) Regulatory frameworks – changing from land use and density rigid zoning towards  pro-poor land market regulations using different land tenure systems.

Why a “Compass”?: Taking into account the challenges presented above, the lecture advocates for the need to reconcile the formal and informal city planning process, carried out by local governments and communities. The lecture discusses application cases in different scales where the participatory planning methodology was applied.

a) Informal settlement upgrade in a metropolitan area of Buenos Aires;

b) City-wide upgrade prevention in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Cochabamba, Bolivia and Suacha, at the outskirt of Bogotá, Colombia;

c) National habitat strategy, the case of high concentration of displaced populations in Kigali, Rwanda;

d) Post conflict planning, designing re-housing projects in Khan Younis, the Gaza Strip, Autonomous Palestinian Territories.

Short analysis of the above issues
Some lessons learnt from the experience highlight the relevance of community self-organization to implement the new urban agenda; the critical importance of linking community and governmental planning exercises to support a progressive fulfilment of their basic human rights; the need for acting simultaneously in multiple scales with a participatory, preventive and resilient approach.

The “Compass” contribute a methodology for participatory planning whose application in different contexts has served to review public policies. So far, results have been encouraging and motivate innovative planning approaches at municipal level, to enable low income neighbours adopting a community approach to address social and environmental problems. Linkages between these process with local authorities have lead to the development of new urban planning regulatory frameworks and public works with successful results indicating the potential of community participation and self-organization overcoming difficulties hard to address by traditional planning approaches dominated by governmental interventions.

Community involvement in public plans results in a very pro-active and preventive urban agenda of recovering public spaces by the people; upgrading slums and recovering social housing by associating public resources and self-organized groups, as well as early recovery strategies carried out by refugees designing their own habitat according to their specific needs.

Propositions for addressing the issue
The “Compass” of cities is a participatory methodology for policy making seeking progressive fulfilment of human rights. It consists of different indicators represented graphically as a “Compass”, combining four fundamental dimensions: Human rights fulfilment, community organization, public works and regulatory frameworks. Each of these dimension measures the same basic habitat needs for land tenure and housing, infrastructure (wat-san), social services (education-health), mobility (public transport) and sustainability (income generation opportunities, disaster risk reduction, etc).

The graph of the compass summarizes the status of human rights in a certain area, resulting of their social organization, public works and regulatory framework success. This contributes to build up a vision for slum upgrading and prevention through participation of their inhabitants, local governments and private sector. It facilitates quick collection of essential and update information for planning purposes through key informants facilitating the understanding and agreement on the most convenient way forward to tackle down informal settlements problems and creation trends.

So far, the instrument has been applied to 25 municipalities from different countries in Latin America, guiding discussion and actions towards negotiated interventions. A coordination team receives periodic reports from teams applying the method in other cities, providing online guidance. This lecture presents comparative research, identifying lessons learnt obtained by the experience applying the methodology in different cities, contexts and scales.

BIOGRAPHY

Fernando Murillo is an architect with a master degree and a Phd in architecture and urban planning. His professional career combines academic activities as lecturer and director of a research program at the University of Buenos Aires with international projects in the field of urban planning, housing and settlement upgrading.

His work contributes to different governments and UN agencies, mostly UN Habitat, in Sudan and South Sudan, building public housing with environmentally friendly technologies and strategic urban planning; UNHCR, building 15,000 shelters for returnees and displaced populations, UNRWA, 12000 housing units for refugees in Gaza Strip and UNDP, developing local government plans in Colombia, Nicaragua, and schools in El Salvador. With World Bank in Zambia he prepares a local integration plan for former refugees eligible for citizenship.

With his interdisciplinary team he developed multiple participatory territorial planning tools to help local governments and communities to work out an integrated and inclusive urbanization strategy with a focus on progressive human rights fulfillment and sustainable development, such as the “Compass” disseminated internationally.

Recently, he founded an international network to analyze the impact of migrant corridors on the phenomena of rapid urbanization, called “Migraplan”.

Source: UN-Habitat

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat. 

China 2017 - Towards Humane Cities

Published on 29 Jun 2017

http://www.weforum.org/
Explore with architect John Lin how design and architecture can help make rapid urbanization a more humane process.

Speaker:
- John Lin, Associate Professor, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR

Moderated by:
- Javeria Masood, Founder and Design Strategy Go-To, The Urban Practice, Pakistan

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

Somik Lall, World Bank - Africa’s Cities, Opening Doors to the World
Published on 20 Jun 2017

Cities in Sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing rapid population growth. Yet their economic growth has not kept pace. Why? One factor might be low capital investment, due in part to Africa’s relative poverty: Other regions have reached similar stages of urbanization at higher per capita GDP. In this lecture Somik Lall from the World Bank discusses a deeper reason: African cities are closed to the world. Compared with other developing cities, cities in Africa produce few goods and services for trade on regional and international markets. To grow economically as they are growing in size, Africa’s cities must open their doors to the world. They need to specialize in manufacturing, along with other regionally and globally tradable goods and services. And to attract global investment in tradables production, cities must develop scale economies, which are associated with successful urban economic development in other regions.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

The Future of Affordable Housing
Published on 18 Jun 2017

Filmed June 7, 2017, at the Asia Pacific Summit in Singapore.

As the global shortage of affordable housing becomes ever more critical, this session focuses on the drivers and emerging solutions to the issue and the roles cities and the real estate market need to play. Views and experiences are shared by those directly involved in housing, in its funding and delivery, and in its planning, policy, and design.
Speakers:
* Nicholas Brooke of Professional Property Services Group
* Dr. Liu Thai Ker of the Centre for Liveable Cities and RSP Architects Planners & Engineers
* Paige Walker of Mirvac
* Carl Weisbrod of HR&A

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

Resilience, Flexibility and Liveability of Urban Space
Published on 19 Jun 2017

Filmed June 7, 2017, at the ULI Asia Pacific Summit in Singapore.

Enhancing the liveability of cities on the basis of the existing urban environment is a huge challenge on its own. The changing world demands improving the resilience of existing assets and buildings as well as cities as a whole, repurposing of assets, and responding to the changing user patterns of urban space.
Speakers:
* Prof. Greg Clark of Urban Land Institute
* William Lee of Microsoft
* Tony Lombardo of Lendlease
* Marilyn Taylor of the University of Pennsylvania School of Design
* Forth Bagley of KPF

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

The Impact of Smart Cities
Published on 20 Jun 2017

Filmed June 7, 2017, at the ULI Asia Pacific Summit in Singapore.
What realistically could be the impact of the smart city concept on land use and real estate development? How will “smart” affect the way the real estate industry operates, competes, and ultimately creates value for society?
Speakers:
* Trevor Vivian of Benoy
* Dr. Cheong Koon Hean of the Singapore Housing and Development Board
* Sean Chiao of AECOM
* Wong Heang Fine of Surbana Jurong

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

Urban Labs The Film
Published on 21 Jun 2017

In 2016 the Netherlands Creative Industries Fund joined hands with UN Habitat Urban Labs. In 5 countries on 4 continents groups of architects, planners and urbanists analyzed the rapid urbanization and together with local experts they developed plans to tackle this or to streamline it. The design teams developed tailor made plans and created a solid foundation for the implementation of the solutions just for the locations.
MEDIAHQ has ben following the process for over a year, filmed on the locations with the design teams and presented the film at the HABITAT III conference in Quito in October 2016.
It is a perfect showcase of solution oriented Dutch urban planning. 
Research by design to contribute to a safe, just and sustainable world.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.  

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