A Tale of Three Cities: India's Exclusionary Urbanisation

ABSTRACT

India has been witnessing rapid urbanisation in the last decade, particularly in its large and medium-size cities. As more and more people move towards cities and towns, it is imperative to build an understanding of how cities are geared in terms of growth and inclusion. In what ways do India's marginalised communities get excluded from the country's growing urban spaces? This paper studies how individuals and groups are included in or excluded from urban transitions. It is based on an empirical examination of inclusion in three Indian cities, part of a project of ORF with the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) in Norway, and also describes the processes of exclusion that have become embedded in India's urban spaces.

Introduction

Our urban spaces and governance mechanisms have become the theatres for political conflicts and economic struggles. 'Exclusionary' urbanization is benefitting certain social groups to the detriment of others, and directing resources to large metropolises depriving small and medium towns of funds needed for infrastructure and essential services - Hamid Ansari, Vice President of India. 

Image: Guwahati, India: Night sky (www.pixabay.com)

Source: Academia

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Author: 
NIRANJAN SAHOO

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